Founder of Cuba’s Granma Newspaper Dies at 67

“In the media, we have tried, with heart and conviction, to continue defending the work that we started very young,” stated Lee Lopez.

 Lee Lopez, founder of Granma, the official newspaper of the Cuban Communist Party, died on May Day at 67 years old after over half a century of prominent reporting about the daily issues and achievements of the Cuban Revolution.

Less than two months ago, she had won the country’s most important journalism award, the Jose Marti Prize.

Thanks to her work, said the jury on the day of the award ceremony, “we can read the historical review of the Revolution in detail, with investigative precision and reliability … She never tried to shine, but her work radiates from her modesty.”

Lee Lopez, born in Cuba from Chinese origins, thanked the jury saying, “As Fidel once said in the 1980s, the labor day is sacred, we consider our profession as a reason to live; in one way or another in the media, we have tried, with heart and conviction, to continue defending the work that we started very young, when others were not even born.”

“We receive (the prize) as the eyes and ears of the people, as the spokespersons of its resistance and sacrifices, its achievements and victories, its errors and failures,” she added, insisting that everyone should feel rewarded.

Lee Lopez started reporting in 1962 on topics related to women and youth for the daily Hoy, and became one of the first reporters at Juventud Rebelde, a Cuban daily produced by the Young Communist League.

She co-founded Granma a few years later, carrying out various reports personally assigned by Fidel Castro, according to Granma. She was also a lawmaker in the lower house for 15 years.

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