The New York Times Recognizes Cuban Contribution against Cholera in Haiti

The New York Times Recognizes Cuban Contribution against Cholera in Haiti

Havana, Cuba, April 2 (ACN) – An extensive report published on Sunday by The York Times recognizes that Cuba’s contribution was essential in the detection of the first cases and also in the treatment of the cholera epidemic that began in Haiti in 2010.

The article points out that, at first, only the Cuban Medical Brigade and Doctors without Borders, both self-financed, “handled the majority of cases.”

“It made no sense. Everybody was in Haiti. It was the biggest density of humanitarian actors in the world, and the two organizations were dealing with 80 percent of the cholera,” said Yann Libessart, spokesman for Doctors without Borders.

The newspaper report adds that the Cuban health professionals dispensed antibiotics —free of charge— to all cholera patients and preventively to their relatives, which prevented the death of thousands of Haitians.

The New York Times recalls that “world health authorities, concerned with cost and drug resistance, initially said antibiotics should be reserved for severe cases.”

According to the article, after 17 months, cholera has killed more than 7,050 Haitians and sickened more than 531,000, or 5 percent of the population.

Cuban health professionals have been making their contribution in Haiti for 13 years, an initiative that has been silenced or ignored by most mainstream media outlets.